Neues Projekt bei Zooniverse

Projekte, bei denen man in manueller Eigenarbeit Daten analysieren muss (Projekt Gutenberg, GalaxyZoo, usw.)
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René
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Neues Projekt bei Zooniverse

#1 Ungelesener Beitrag von René » 18.01.2017 13:15

Hallo,

bei Zooniverse wurde ein neues manuelles Projekt gestartet: ridges.planetfour.org.

Gruß René

René
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Re: Neues Projekt bei Zooniverse

#2 Ungelesener Beitrag von René » 16.02.2017 12:39

Hallo,

bei Zooniverse wurde wieder mal ein neues Projekt aus der Taufe gehoben:

https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/mar ... 9/classify

Es geht um die Suche nach "Planet 9" in den "WISE"-Daten. Es ist auch wieder ein manuelles Projekt. Womöglich entdeckt man auch bisher unbekannte braune Zwerge.

Viel Glück!

René

René
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Re: Neues Projekt bei Zooniverse

#3 Ungelesener Beitrag von René » 06.12.2018 20:26

Hallo,

vor Weihnachten ein neues Projekt von Zooniverse:

Hi there,

I've got some really exciting news for you today. One of our most popular projects is back with a brand new look and fresh data - Planet Hunters TESS

TESS is NASA’s new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which will spend the next two years looking for distant alien worlds. The first data release is finally within our reach and we are ready to find planets around other stars in our Galaxy.

The original Planet Hunters project used data from the Kepler mission, which came to an end earlier this year. But with the end of Kepler comes the beginning of TESS, and with that an exciting new project: Planet Hunters TESS. Throughout the mission, TESS will point its four cameras at two-hundred-thousand bright nearby stars, four-hundred times more than Kepler observed throughout its lifetime. These TESS target stars will be closer and brighter than the Kepler targets, which will allow us to more easily observe planet candidates using Earth-based telescopes. The discovery of many more worlds will further our knowledge of planet formation and evolution, and will allow us to better understand the galaxy in which we live.

Start hunting for planets right now at www.planethunters.org

Thanks for your help!

Grant & the Zooniverse Team

Gruß René

René
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Re: Neues Projekt bei Zooniverse

#4 Ungelesener Beitrag von René » 22.06.2019 07:26

Hallo,
wieder mal ein neues Projekt bei Zooniverse.

Hi there,

Have you ever wondered what shape the Universe is? What about dark matter and dark energy? Would you like to know what they are and how they behave? If the answer to any of these questions is “yes”, then you aren’t alone. The quest to understand these mysterious and fundamental phenomena occupies many professional astronomers and cosmologists on a daily basis.

To gather the observational data that we need in order to test our theories, scientists and engineers from around the world designed the Euclid Space Telescope. Euclid will survey a huge area of the sky in unprecedented detail, providing exquisite images of millions of galaxies spanning the history of the Universe from just 4 billion years after the Big Bang, right up until the present day. For a tiny fraction of the galaxies that Euclid will observe, the light that they emit will be distorted by a phenomenon called "gravitational lensing". Gravitational lensing happens when the light from one distant galaxy passes close to another foreground galaxy on its journey to Earth. The gravity of the foreground galaxy bends the light around it, acting like a lens and distorting the distant galaxy’s image distinctive ways. If we can find enough gravitational lenses and study their properties, we’ll be many steps closer to understanding the most fundamental constituents and properties of our Universe.

To learn how to do this we need your help! We have millions of galaxies to search for gravitational lensing signatures and it turns out that doing this automatically is really difficult. Simple computer algorithms just aren’t up to the task and modern AI techniques need gigantic sets of pre-labeled training data to be effective. On the other hand, volunteers like you only need to see a few examples to become very adept lens spotters. Euclid: Challenge the Machines is a brand new Zooniverse project that asks you to identify simulated gravitational lenses that the automated searches might miss, so that we can learn how to do better. We hope that your classifications can be used to teach the machines what to look for, so that they can do the really heavy lifting and find every single lens that those millions of galaxy images contain.

Get involved at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/hug ... s/classify.

Thanks for your help,

Hugh & the Euclid: Challenge the Machines team

Gruß René

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